Ski Salt Lake Super Pass available to locals

Snowbird (Austen Diamond / Visit Salt Lake)
Snowbird (Austen Diamond / Visit Salt Lake)
Snowbird (Austen Diamond / Visit Salt Lake)

Every winter, Salt Lake transforms itself into Ski City, Utah’s urban gateway to The Greatest Snow on Earth®. And locals can’t wait to get out and play in their amazing backyard playground. The Ski City Super Pass provides a flexible and value-laden way to enjoy multiple days of fun at Alta, Brighton, Snowbird and Solitude. It’s a great way to purchase a set number of ski days at substantial discounts from individual day pass rates – perfect for Utah residents who procrastinated and missed buying the IKON Pass in December or one of the resort’s season passes.

Local Skiers and snowboarders in search of a great deal can purchase a Ski City Super Pass any time throughout the winter, one of the industry’s most flexible and value-laden passes, good at all four Ski City resorts. The direct-to-lift Super Pass lets skiers and riders bypass the ticket window and includes free transportation to and from the resorts via UTA ski buses and TRAX light rail. It also offers equipment rental discounts at participating rental locations.

Super Passes are sold online and offered in increments of three to 10 days (and valid over a 14-day period) with no blackout dates. Per-person savings range from $180 for a 3-day to $677 for the 10-day Super Pass, based on average window ticket prices plus round-trip UTA transportation each day.

Pricing:                Adult Pass                          Junior Pass

Days                     Per Day Price                    Per Day Price

3-4                        $118                                    $68

5-6                        $113                                    $63

7-10                      $108                                    $58

Not surprisingly, the pandemic has brought a host of new rules and considerations this year at Utah’s resorts. Go to Visit Salt Lake for COVID-19 restrictions and updates.

2020-21 RESORT NEWS/UPDATES

Alta Ski Area

Alta Ski Area has a number of Covid-19 policies that includes new regulations for parking at the resort. All Alta skiers, even those with a pre-purchased lift ticket such as the Super Pass, will be subject to parking availability. To help manage that, the resort has introduced a new parking forecast tool on its website to help. As for on-mountain dining, Alf’s Restaurant and Watson Cafe will have 50% indoor capacity, with skiers asked to limit their time to 30 minutes inside these restaurants. Collin’s Grill is closed for the season. Alta is also encouraging grab-and-go food options, available at Baldy Brews, Alta Java and the two food trucks located in each base parking lot. One new on-mountain activity is Birding on Skis, led by Tracy Aviary’s expert birders. These sessions run from 9 am-Noon on the second Friday of each month starting in December. They’re free but require registration in advance.

Brighton Resort

Brighton Resort has addressed Covid-19  concerns and implemented some new policies for the 2020-2021 season. Lift tickets can be purchased online and then picked up at a new electronic kiosk at the resort, contact-free. All lift tickets must be purchased in advance either through the resort’s website or through participating retail partners. For winter dining, Molly Greens now serves food in the downstairs area of the A-frame, and it will be open to families. Upstairs will continue to be a 21+, full-service bar and grill, with extra space between tables, and payment by credit card is required. Guests can order grab-and-go food from other Brighton eateries through the resort’s website and eat at provided slope side seating. Limited indoor dining is still available, and tables will be spread apart to maintain social distancing. Outdoor dining has been expanded to include more patio space. The brown bag area below Molly Greens has been removed and those who bring their own lunch are encouraged to eat in their car.

Snowbird

Snowbird has implemented Operation Stay Safe to address Covid-19 concerns, a program that includes a parking reservation system allowing Snowbird to safely manage the number of skiers and riders at the mountain on any given day. It also enables guests to lock in a guaranteed parking spot. Snowbird has expanded grab-and-go food offerings across the resort, added an additional 15,000-square feet of indoor space, and extended maze designs for lateral spacing. Snowbird also launched a new app that features live chairlift status and wait times, mountain conditions and webcams, as well as the ability to track your day on the mountain and find friends. Those who opt for push notifications will quickly learn of lift status changes and road closures. The app is available for download on both iOS and Android phones. What hasn’t changed this winter is that Snowbird still offers Utah’s longest ski and snowboard season.

Solitude Mountain Resort

Solitude Mountain Resort is not requiring advance reservations for skiing or boarding this winter, but day tickets must be purchased in advance for a specific date as same-day lift tickets will not be available on-site. Those redeeming Ski City Super Pass vouchers can do so at ticket windows while those already with Super Pass cards can go directly to the lifts. However, reservations for rentals are required this season. The resort will use historic entrance data to set specific daily caps for potentially crowded days. The resort has added grab-and-go food options, additional outdoor seating and heaters to some restaurants, and spread out the seating for indoor dining restaurants. Touchless faucets, as well as touchless soap and paper towel dispensers, have been installed, as have additional hand sanitizer stations inside the resort.

For more information, visit the Ski City website with much more information about what makes this urban center the ideal basecamp for skiers and snowboarders.

Stuart is the founder, writer and wrangler at several sites including Gastronomic SLC, Utah Now and, The Utah Review; Stuart is a former restaurant critic of more than five years, working for the Salt Lake Tribune and has worked extensively with other local publications from Utah Stories through to Salt Lake Magazine and Visit Salt Lake.